The Golf Paper https://www.thegolfpaper.co.uk Wed, 02 Jun 2021 14:40:40 +0000 en-GB hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 Will The Open throw up another surprise? https://www.thegolfpaper.co.uk/golf-news/3437/will-the-open-throw-up-another-surprise/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=will-the-open-throw-up-another-surprise Tue, 01 Jun 2021 14:35:00 +0000 https://www.thegolfpaper.co.uk/?p=3437 The Royal St George’s Golf Club in Sandwich hosts the 2021 Open, and if the last two tournaments staged at the venue are anything to go by, we should have a new major winner on the circuit. In 2003, Ben Curtis stunned the field with a solid performance in tricky conditions to claim the Claret […]

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The Royal St George’s Golf Club in Sandwich hosts the 2021 Open, and if the last two tournaments staged at the venue are anything to go by, we should have a new major winner on the circuit.

In 2003, Ben Curtis stunned the field with a solid performance in tricky conditions to claim the Claret Jug with a one-under card for the competition. Curtis gradually moved his way through the field and beat out his rivals for the title, despite a wobble on the back nine where he almost allowed Thomas Bjorn to close in. It was the American’s first and only major of his career to date.

Darren Clarke fell narrowly short in The Open in 1997 and endured a few near misses, but his time competing for the top crowns appeared to be over until he found life at Sandwich. The Welshman had not finished in the top 10 of a major for eight years before he put forward a composed performance over the four days of the competition. Once Clarke established a lead, he could not be shifted from the top of the leaderboard, earning his first and only major.

In 2021, could someone emerge to make their mark on The Open in the same way that Clarke and Curtis did at the Royal St George’s Golf Club to make it three surprises on the bounce?

Lee Westwood

Lee Westwood has come close to winning a major on several occasions in the past. He has finished second twice at The Masters and was the runner-up for the Claret Jug in 2010. Overall, Westwood has 12 top-five finishes across all four majors. At the age of 48, his powers are not what they were when he was world number one for a period.

However, he is still a marvellous player when operating at the peak of his powers as The Players’ Championship this year proved when he placed second. The weight of expectations should be lifted from his shoulders. Phil Mickelson proved at the PGA Championship that age is no barrier to success on the grand stage. Westwood could be the man to rise to the occasion, being back in the golf betting odds at 50/1 to win the crown. It would be nice to see one of golf’s good guys emerge with a major before it’s too late.

Ian Poulter

The 45-year-old is another player that has been frustrating to watch on the major scene. It seems that he saves his best golf for the Ryder Cup when he is placed in a team environment. Poulter has enjoyed spurts of success, winning the World Matchplay Championship in 2010 and the WGC-HSBC Champions in 2012.

However, he has never been able to manoeuvre himself into a strong enough position to get over the line at a major. Poulter’s best opportunity came in 2008 at The Open, but he was still four strokes off the pace of Padraig Harrington in a high-scoring competition at the Royal Birkdale Golf Club. He has not been competitive at a major since 2015, but Sandwich could be the great equaliser that Poulter requires.

We’ve already seen two surprises at the first two majors of the calendar year. We can only hope that excitement continues at the Royal St George’s Golf Club at The Open.

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Dustin Johnson leads 2021 PGA Championship odds—but challengers offer real value https://www.thegolfpaper.co.uk/featured/3435/dustin-johnson-leads-2021-pga-championship-odds-but-challengers-offer-real-value/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=dustin-johnson-leads-2021-pga-championship-odds-but-challengers-offer-real-value Tue, 18 May 2021 11:10:14 +0000 https://www.thegolfpaper.co.uk/?p=3435 Two majors in 14 years as a professional golfer just doesn’t seem right considering Dustin Johnson’s impact on the sport, but the world’s top-ranked star returns as favourite to win the 2021 PGA Championship. “DJ” bombed at the Masters in April when he missed the cut at a major tournament for the first time in […]

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Two majors in 14 years as a professional golfer just doesn’t seem right considering Dustin Johnson’s impact on the sport, but the world’s top-ranked star returns as favourite to win the 2021 PGA Championship.

“DJ” bombed at the Masters in April when he missed the cut at a major tournament for the first time in nearly three years, but that hasn’t impeded his odds of a comeback win in May.

The second major of the year will be contested at Kiawah Island Golf Resort in South Carolina between May 20-23, and Johnson is once again at the shortest price of 12/1. The world No. 1 has finished second in each of the last two PGA Championships, but golfing gamblers may be better off wagering their money elsewhere when hedging this year’s winner.

Johnson’s disappointing display at Augusta last month was in stark contrast to his triumph at the previous Masters, where the New York Times tracked his performance in winning by a bigger margin than any before him.

The Golf Paper profiled several stars who have a lot to prove in 2021, and two of the names on that list feature among the odds leaders for this year’s tournament.

One worth special attention is 14/1 Bryson Dechambeau, who tied for fourth at last year’s PGA Championship before going on to win the U.S. Open, his maiden major title. “The Scientist” is renowned for his powerful drives off the tee, but the Ocean Course at Kiawah may demand a little more nuance around the fairways considering it’s highly regarded as a difficult one to play.

With that in mind, Rory McIlroy—another of those players in need of a big 2021—could strike out from his 20/1 listing as a surprise contender despite being hit-and-miss at the PGA in recent years. McIlroy won this tournament in 2012 and 2014, the former of which just so happened to be the first time Kiawah hosted the PGA Championship.

And then there’s the defending champion, Collin Morikawa, who became the third-youngest player to win the championship when he triumphed at TPC Harding Park at the age of 23 last year. It’s damning of the Californian that his only major title also happened to be the only time he’s finished inside the top 15 of golf’s big four, but 22/1 odds with bet365 bonus for the UK players hint he’s in with a chance nonetheless:

Hideki Matsuyama—winner of the 2021 Masters—and Webb Simpson round out the top 10 odds leaders ahead of this month’s major, each with odds worth more than twice that of leader Johnson.

The PGS Championship has thrown up its share of surprise victors this side of the millennium, but the champions list is largely a collection of household names. Tiger Woods (four titles), Phil Mickelson, Justin Thomas and Brooks Koepka (twice) have all lifted the Wanamaker Trophy in modern times, with history suggesting another well-known contender will rise above the competition in South Carolina.

GolferPGA Championship Odds
Dustin Johnson12/1
Jon Rahm14/1
Bryson Dechambeau14/1
Justin Thomas14/1
Xander Schauffele16/1
Rory McIlroy20/1
Brooks Koepka22/1
Collin Morikawa22/1
Hideki Matsuyama25/1
Webb Simpson33/1

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Level Up your Game with the Golf App https://www.thegolfpaper.co.uk/golf-news/3424/level-up-your-game-with-the-golf-app/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=level-up-your-game-with-the-golf-app Wed, 07 Apr 2021 11:14:00 +0000 https://www.thegolfpaper.co.uk/?p=3424 From clubs to apparel, balls, green fees and devices, both beginners and pro-golfers spend a significant sum of money just to improve and enjoy the sport. An additional tool that you must consider if you want to take your game to the next level is a professionally mapped golf GPS app. This is quite different […]

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From clubs to apparel, balls, green fees and devices, both beginners and pro-golfers spend a significant sum of money just to improve and enjoy the sport. An additional tool that you must consider if you want to take your game to the next level is a professionally mapped golf GPS app. This is quite different from the images that are based on Google maps.

The golf app is becoming more important for today’s golfer because, in this sport, your playing position matters most than the distance. That is, it is not about who will hit the ball farthest but who will get to the hole with fewer strokes. As such, going for a golf GPS app means you are ready to level up your game with exact and meticulously calculated moves. Using a GPS app gives you a bird’s eye view of the entire golf course so that you are more strategic with your moves than simply basing your play on attaining longer drivers.

Why Should You Use a Golf GPS App?

The use of GPS devices is common among golfers especially if you never want to be off the course. Nothing beats the ability to accurately determine distances to the green as well as view hazards with multiple geo-referenced targets per hole when playing. The golf app technology has advanced over the years enhancing the sport significantly because of better precision.  

Here are 3 reasons ways you can level up your game with the golf GPS app:

Better Time Management

If there is one thing that golfers spend time on while on the golf course, then it is the time it takes to gauge distance. The golf GPS app takes care of this by displaying all the information you need about the course. This eliminates the need for brochures, books or fliers to determine where you are. When you switch to using a GPS app, you won’t have to spend time looking at certain features of the course to manually estimate how far you are from the pin hence saving you time.

The other advantage of using GPS is that when you are certain about the distances, you don’t have to worry about undershooting that will mean you taking more strokes than you want to, thus preventing unnecessary delays. A golf GPS app will help you to lower your scores letting you become an efficient player.

Accuracy of Distance and Location

Before the introduction of golf GPS, it was quite taxing to pinpoint the exact location in a golf course or even the hole you’re playing. Today, golf GPS apps have made it possible to have an aerial view with clear details of green hazards, green distances, your overall scores, time and distance. When you know your exact location and have accurate distances of your ball from the centre of the green will inform the decisions you will take like the club that is most suited for each shot. Most GPS apps have short distance features making it easy to determine how far you must hit with each club.

Increased satisfaction with the game

Among all the benefits that the golf GPS app offers, none beats the fact that it increases your satisfaction with the game. This app eliminates guesswork along with all the time-consuming tactics of determining distance within the golf course while making it easier to judge shots as you navigate and play along the scenic landscape. Ultimately, GPS apps equip you with crucial information to help you come up with better tactics and play smarter.

The good thing about the golf app is that it is not limited to a specific category of players. Thus, whether you are a beginner, intermediate or advanced player, you can tap into the power of this tool to advance your play. You can play according to your current skills. For instance, if you are more skilled you only want accurate measurements of distance. Conversely, a beginner may be interested more in features to do with shots and stats.

The versatility of GPS apps means that every player will tap into the benefits they desire to achieve based on their current style of play, skill level and favourite golf course among other factors. Ultimately, a golf GPS application is one of the most affordable and effective ways of improving your game no matter your current level. You may not need to invest in a personal caddie immediately given the expense involved yet you can tap as much insight as you would from the caddie.  

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Five of the Biggest Shocks in Masters Golf History https://www.thegolfpaper.co.uk/golf-news/3421/five-of-the-biggest-shocks-in-masters-golf-history/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=five-of-the-biggest-shocks-in-masters-golf-history https://www.thegolfpaper.co.uk/golf-news/3421/five-of-the-biggest-shocks-in-masters-golf-history/#respond Tue, 06 Apr 2021 11:57:00 +0000 https://www.thegolfpaper.co.uk/?p=3421 While the Ryder Cup is a great spectacle, and all of golf’s majors are highly coveted prizes for all golfers, there’s one tournament win that’s the pinnacle of every golfer’s career: The Masters. Winning the Green Jacket at Augusta National is a rite of passage and is something that all golfers aspire to throughout their […]

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While the Ryder Cup is a great spectacle, and all of golf’s majors are highly coveted prizes for all golfers, there’s one tournament win that’s the pinnacle of every golfer’s career: The Masters. Winning the Green Jacket at Augusta National is a rite of passage and is something that all golfers aspire to throughout their careers. Dustin Johnson won his first-ever green jacket at Augusta last year, the only surprise being that it has taken Dustin this long to clinch his first-ever Masters’ title.

Tiger winning at Augusta in 2019 was more of a shock, given the fact that many had ruled his career all but over after a tumultuous few years following his unrivalled success in the early part of his career. But Tiger’s win doesn’t make our list of the top five biggest shocks in Masters golf history. Let’s take a look at them now.

1. Larry Mize, 1987 

Larry Mize’s success in ’87 at Augusta may just be the biggest upset in the whole of golf, let alone The Masters. In one of Augusta’s most famous playoffs to date, Mize battled it out with Seve and Greg Norman. After eliminating Seve, Mize landed a 140-yard chip to pip Norman at the death, and Mize clinched the win. What makes Mize’s success so remarkable is the fact that until ’87, he was relatively unknown in the world of golf, coupled with the fact that he’s an Augusta native. Arguably Augusta’s most popular, and shock, winner.

2. Danny Willett, 2016 

In 2016, Willett became only the second-ever Englishman to win the Masters. But it might be fair to say although Willet was superb, his title was handed to him by Jordan Speith’s self-implosion. Speith went into the week in the form of his life and looked all but certain of clinching consecutive titles at Augusta going into the last six holes with a five-shot lead. While Speith undoubtedly capitulated, Willett sunk an impressive three birdies in the final six to mark perhaps the greatest ever turnaround in Masters history, something which many of the biggest golf betting websites didn’t predict, resulting in huge losses for them.

3. Charl Schwartzel, 2011

In 2011, South African Charl Schwartzel clinched the Masters in a similar way to Danny Willett in 2016. He carded an impressive 66 on the last day to clinch victory, ahead of Aussies Jason Day and Adam Scott. However, the 2011 Masters will forever be remembered as the one that got away from Rory Mcilroy. Mcilroy, then 21, was in scintillating form going into the competition. He led for the first three rounds, and all he needed to do was keep a level head going into the last day. Sadly for Rory, he capitulated on the back nine and carded a round of eighty to drop back to four under. His run from the tenth included a triple-bogey, bogey, and double-bogey, a disastrous run that Schwartzel impressively capitalised on to clinch his maiden major title.

4. Trevor Immelman, 2008 

The second South African on this list, Immelman’s win in 2008 is nothing short of a fairy tale. Just four months before the Masters, Immelman had an operation to remove a tumour on his diaphragm, which could have spelled the end of his promising career. Instead, he turned up to Augusta and played the golf of his life, carding 68, 68, and 69 going into the last. He saw off the threat of Tiger in the final round and secured his first and only major. Overcoming life-threatening surgery and winning the pinnacle prize in golf in the same year earned Immelman much praise amongst his peers, and he’s remembered fondly as a popular underdog winner at Augusta.

5. Zach Johnson, 2007 

The year prior to Immelman’s win saw another shock win at Augusta, as unfancied Zach Johnson took the prize. Although a household name today, back in 2007, Johnson was a relative unknown, and all the attention was on Tiger. It wasn’t just fans of golf that didn’t fancy him; he was priced at 125-1 by the bookies, carrying odds better than only eleven other players in the field. Despite not being fancied, Johnson was consistent throughout the week and birdied three of his final six holes to hold off Tiger in windy conditions. Johnson has built upon his success at Augusta in 2007 and has since gone on to claim the Open Championship and has been a critical component of the US Ryder Cup team.

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Dustin Johnson Looking Imperious Ahead Of The Masters https://www.thegolfpaper.co.uk/golf-news/3418/dustin-johnson-looking-imperious-ahead-of-the-masters/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=dustin-johnson-looking-imperious-ahead-of-the-masters https://www.thegolfpaper.co.uk/golf-news/3418/dustin-johnson-looking-imperious-ahead-of-the-masters/#respond Tue, 16 Mar 2021 14:27:30 +0000 https://www.thegolfpaper.co.uk/?p=3418 On Sunday, 15 November, 2020 Dustin Johnson made history. He won the Masters Tournament with a record score of 268 that saw him finish 20-under-par. It was his second major, following his victory at the 2016 U.S. Open. He’s followed up his record-breaking 2020 form by winning the Saudi International. To put a bit of […]

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On Sunday, 15 November, 2020 Dustin Johnson made history. He won the Masters Tournament with a record score of 268 that saw him finish 20-under-par.

It was his second major, following his victory at the 2016 U.S. Open.

He’s followed up his record-breaking 2020 form by winning the Saudi International. To put a bit of perspective on that success, there have been three Saudi International tournaments held since it was launched in 2019, and Johnson has won two of them.

Fans, commentators, and sports betting sites alike believe there will be no four year gap between Johnson’s second and third major. He’s in imperious form and they all know it.

Golf fan Ben Broderick tweeted on 7 Feb 2021 that Johnson is primed for another Masters win, writing:

“A little late but here are my pick for the 2021 Major Championships:

The Masters (Augusta National): Dustin Johnson

U.S. Open (Torrey Pines): Brooks Koepka

PGA Championship (Kiawah): Rory McIlroy

The Open Championship (Royal St. George): Dustin Johnson”.

Golf Columnist and pro, Paul McGinley wasted little time making ominous claims about Johnson. Just two days after Johnson’s Masters win, McGinley wrote “there are more majors to come, there is no doubt about that”.

He added that “he [Johnson] is in a different place mentally as a golfer. His course management, his golfing IQ, is on a different level now than it ever was before”.

Highly-regarded betting site 888 Casino clearly believes Johnson is the man in form ahead of the Masters. He’s the site’s favourite to win the event, with his odds currently at 6.50 and his closest rivals (John Rahm and Rory McIlroy) who are both on 11.0.

To give you an indication of just how in form that makes Johnson, it means a winning £10 bet at 888 casino on Johnson would give a return of £65. That same £10 wager on either Rahm or McIlroy would bring a return of £110.

In other words, Johnson’s form is nearly twice as good as his nearest rivals.

Given that the word means to be “commanding, dominant, superior”, it’s fair to say that Johnson certainly looks to be fulfilling the criteria required to call his pre-Masters form imperious.

But what does Johnson think of his form?

Speaking as part of his press duties for the 2021 The Players Championship, Johnson said “I feel like the game’s in pretty good form coming in. I’ve put in some good work in the last couple of days and I’m feeling good”.

If fans, commentators, betting sites and the man himself all think his form is leading him towards a 2021 Masters win, it’s a pretty ominous sign for Rahm, McIlroy and the other players hoping to take Johnson’s title.

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Three Big Name Golfers with Something to Prove in 2021: https://www.thegolfpaper.co.uk/golf-news/3414/three-big-name-golfers-with-something-to-prove-in-2021/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=three-big-name-golfers-with-something-to-prove-in-2021 https://www.thegolfpaper.co.uk/golf-news/3414/three-big-name-golfers-with-something-to-prove-in-2021/#respond Wed, 10 Mar 2021 12:38:45 +0000 http://www.thegolfpaper.co.uk/?p=3414 It can seem somewhat patronising to talk about elite sports stars having something to prove. After all, they are better than 99.999% of us at their craft. So, when we talk about three players with something to prove in 2021, it is with the paradoxical caveat that they actually have nothing to prove at all. […]

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It can seem somewhat patronising to talk about elite sports stars having something to prove. After all, they are better than 99.999% of us at their craft. So, when we talk about three players with something to prove in 2021, it is with the paradoxical caveat that they actually have nothing to prove at all.

You get the drift, though. We want to pinpoint a couple of things that will hopefully work out better for these top golfers, all of whom are currently in the world’s top ten. So, take our criticisms with a pinch of salt:

Rory McIlroy

Where he needs to improve: Streakiness

Exactly a year ago, McIlroy was back in the world number one spot after a five-year hiatus. He was playing ultra-consistent golf with several consecutive top ten finishes and generally seemed to be in the form of his career. However, golf’s enforced postponement appeared to take the wind out of his sails, and McIlroy looked a different prospect when tournaments resumed in the early summer. McIlroy’s 2020 could act as a microcosm for his career. At times supreme – better than anyone on the planet – and other times looking hapless. McIlroy has been a professional for 14 years now, and we might just have to accept that he is a streaky player. But what he and his fans would give to be able to sustain the great side of his game for longer periods. McIlroy has started 2021 quite well, looking almost his old self when finishing third in the HSBC Championship in Abu Dhabi. He will hope to get into a rhythm by the time the Masters comes around in April. But with the Northern Irishman, who knows?

Tyrell Hatton

Where he needs to improve: The Majors

Hatton may be the newly-minted world number five, but his record in Majors in 2020 reads: Cut, Cut, Cut. In 2019, it was: 56th, 48th, 21st and a sole top ten finish – 6th in The Open at Royal Portrush. 2018 was much better, with two top ten finishes. But he was cut in four consecutive Majors in 2017. Hatton is becoming an elite player, and he has demonstrated on several occasions that he can tame the best courses and beat the best players. But he will be the first to admit that his game has been all over the place at the Majors. Augusta has proved particularly difficult for Hatton, who has yet to finish in the top 40 at the Masters. He is rated as a 28/1 chance with MansionBet golf betting to win the Green Jacket, and you would be inclined to agree with those high odds. With Hatton, you get the feeling there will be a kind of eureka moment, where he cracks the majors and never looks back.

Bryson DeChambeau

Where he needs to improve: He can offer more than power

It’s not fair to say that Bryson DeChambeau was found out at Augusta in the Masters last November, but his game seemed ill-suited to a course that can punish mistakes. It has always been too simplistic to say that DeChambeau is all power and no finesse, but you have to wonder where he would be without that awesome driving capability, particularly if the PGA follows through with its threat to limit players’ distance.

However, it is notable that many of the world’s top players no longer seem to be too bothered about catching up with DeChambeau in terms of driving distance. Players like Tony Finau have effectively said it’s not for them, and they will instead focus on their short game. That’s exactly where DeChambeau needs to find some improvement, perhaps more so than any other player in the world’s top ten. DeChambeau thinks about his game a lot, though, so don’t be surprised to see him come up with some dastardly plan to adjust those metrics.

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Why Bryson DeChambeau Has Caused A Stir In Golf? https://www.thegolfpaper.co.uk/featured/3410/why-bryson-dechambeau-has-caused-a-stir-in-golf/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=why-bryson-dechambeau-has-caused-a-stir-in-golf https://www.thegolfpaper.co.uk/featured/3410/why-bryson-dechambeau-has-caused-a-stir-in-golf/#respond Tue, 16 Feb 2021 09:43:53 +0000 https://www.thegolfpaper.co.uk/?p=3410 Bryson DeChambeau has had quite a transformation over the last 18 months. The American has put on over 20lbs of muscle which has helped him drive the ball much further off the tee on the golf course. Before his notable change in physique, DeChambeau was very capable of having success. He was a five-time PGA […]

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Bryson DeChambeau has had quite a transformation over the last 18 months. The American has put on over 20lbs of muscle which has helped him drive the ball much further off the tee on the golf course.
Before his notable change in physique, DeChambeau was very capable of having success. He was a five-time PGA Tour winner. Not satisfied with where his game was going though, the man from California felt he needed to improve his strength to take the next step in the sport.

The early signs suggest this significant change to his body has worked. He is now a Major winner after prevailing in the 2020 US Open at Winged Foot. He also scored last year in the Rocket Mortgage Classic, finishing that PGA Tour event with a final score of -23.

DeChambeau will be targeting more Major glory in 2021, however, his chances may have taken a hit recently as golf’s governing body are looking into a rule change which would ban 48-inch drivers. This is being looked at in March, just weeks before the start of the US Masters at Augusta National.

The American is very capable of blasting his ball off the tee close to 400 yards on many of the par four and five holes in Georgia, with or without the 48-inch drive. Therefore, the impact may be minimal. Many of his rivals though, feel the club should be banned in order to make it more of a level playing field in the sport.

DeChambeau is 11/1 in the golf betting for the 2021 US Masters. He has only Dustin Johnson (6/1), Rory McIlroy (9/1) and Jon Rahm (10/1) ahead of him in the outright market for the Green Jacket. Johnson currently holds the top spot in the World Golf Rankings, a position the Scientist is looking to reach in the near future. Victory in Georgia will help him close the gap.

His Form At Augusta Has Not Been Great

The seven-time PGA Tour winner went into the US Masters in 2020 as many golf pundits’ pick for the tournament. They felt his extra distance would prove the telling factor, however, he could only finish in a tie for 34th place as Johnson came out on top after the 72 holes.

This year will be DeChambeau’s fifth appearance in the Major Championship at Augusta. The best he has fared so far is a tie for 21st, which he achieved as an amateur in 2016. In all four of his visits to the tournament, he has made the cut.

The Scientist will be hoping for a bit more control from the tee this year. Last November, he was very erratic which meant finding the greens proved more difficult. He will be expected to score heavily on the par-five holes, where there should be lots of eagle opportunities for the world number nine.

DeChambeau may not be the most popular player on the PGA Tour, but he has done something to break the norm. Time will tell if it proves to be a move that sees him reach the very top in the sport.

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Ways Data Science and Analysis are Pushing Golf Forward https://www.thegolfpaper.co.uk/golf-news/3406/ways-data-science-and-analysis-are-pushing-golf-forward-2/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=ways-data-science-and-analysis-are-pushing-golf-forward-2 https://www.thegolfpaper.co.uk/golf-news/3406/ways-data-science-and-analysis-are-pushing-golf-forward-2/#respond Wed, 30 Dec 2020 13:40:21 +0000 https://www.thegolfpaper.co.uk/?p=3406 In recent years golf has been brought well and truly into the 21st century, with technology and computer science affecting almost every aspect of the game, from club design, to clothing, from how people practice, to how people watch and follow the game, and even how caddies will do their job in the future. In […]

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In recent years golf has been brought well and truly into the 21st century, with technology and computer science affecting almost every aspect of the game, from club design, to clothing, from how people practice, to how people watch and follow the game, and even how caddies will do their job in the future.

In this article we look at just some of the ways that data collection techniques have pushed the sport forward, as well as what this could mean for future players, coaches, and fans.

Data analysis has taken the sport of golf to a whole new level, allowing players to improve faster and fans to follow the game more closely than ever before

More Data Means Less Doubt for Players and Spectators

Golf used to be a mysterious game, with players and spectators amazed and frustrated in equal measure by the peaks and troughs of form that a player could experience both during a round of golf and across the entirety of a season.

This led to some pro players driving themselves crazy, as they tried everything possible to find out what had gone wrong, so they could go about fixing it on the practice greens and driving ranges.

All that has changed substantially in recent years, with data collection and analytics taking some of the mystique out of the game, changing the way virtually everyone involved in the sport is forced to think about it. Indeed, ask most top PGA or LPGA players which parts of their game they need to work on and they will be able to tell you in exacting detail, and that is all brought about by the data collection techniques used in golf today, with pro coaches and sports bettors alike needing to have a firm grasp of the numbers in order to be successful.

Data in golf has come a long way since the days of scribbling your score on a paper scorecard

The “Are Drivers Too Powerful” Debate Driven by Data and Tech

Ever since the arrival of the likes of Tom Daly and Tiger Woods, golf aficionados have been questioning whether men and women who can drive the ball onto the green of a par four hole are good or bad for the game.

But what was it that helped such players put such distance on their shots in the first place?

Partly it is down to better physical conditioning, but there are also other factors at play, such as club and ball design.

The clever people at Titleist were ultimately the folks who managed to make a golf ball so good that it was actually too good. That ball was the Pro V1.

Data science and other lab techniques allowed Titleist to create a multi-layer core ball that the numbers showed completely outperformed all other balls by a significant margin, to the point that virtually every pro on tour was using one upon its release. The stats also show that the ball increased average drive distances by 6-yards.

Allied to this is the ever-improving data collected on clubs themselves, many of which also add a few extra yards to a drive or iron shot. Add all those accumulated extra yards together and suddenly some courses are looking far too short.

This has led to the data now being used to argue the case for reduced-distance balls, which will stop players gaming courses by dodging intended hazards with booming oversized drives.

Courses are Also Not Safe from the Revolution

While the data helps golf iron out its issues with club and ball technology, it is also pointing the way for how golf will be played and enjoyed in the future.

This is particularly pertinent in the case of the golf courses and resorts themselves, which in their current forms have long been known to be too inefficient, environmentally damaging, costly, and overly slow to play.

Data analysis as well as some welcome input from pros like Tiger Woods, mean that the future of golf courses may be going shorter rather than longer, as clubs try to cash in by attracting younger members who want to pepper a pin rather than trudge for miles round an 18-hole course.

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Ways Data Science and Analysis are Pushing Golf Forward https://www.thegolfpaper.co.uk/golf-news/3405/ways-data-science-and-analysis-are-pushing-golf-forward/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=ways-data-science-and-analysis-are-pushing-golf-forward https://www.thegolfpaper.co.uk/golf-news/3405/ways-data-science-and-analysis-are-pushing-golf-forward/#respond Mon, 28 Dec 2020 17:33:15 +0000 https://www.thegolfpaper.co.uk/?p=3405 In recent years golf has been brought well and truly into the 21st century, with technology and computer science affecting almost every aspect of the game, from club design, to clothing, from how people practice, to how people watch and follow the game, and even how caddies will do their job in the future. In […]

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In recent years golf has been brought well and truly into the 21st century, with technology and computer science affecting almost every aspect of the game, from club design, to clothing, from how people practice, to how people watch and follow the game, and even how caddies will do their job in the future.

In this article we look at just some of the ways that data collection techniques have pushed the sport forward, as well as what this could mean for future players, coaches, and fans.

Data analysis has taken the sport of golf to a whole new level, allowing players to improve faster and fans to follow the game more closely than ever before

More Data Means Less Doubt for Players and Spectators

Golf used to be a mysterious game, with players and spectators amazed and frustrated in equal measure by the peaks and troughs of form that a player could experience both during a round of golf and across the entirety of a season.

This led to some pro players driving themselves crazy, as they tried everything possible to find out what had gone wrong, so they could go about fixing it on the practice greens and driving ranges.

All that has changed substantially in recent years, with data collection and analytics taking some of the mystique out of the game, changing the way virtually everyone involved in the sport is forced to think about it. Indeed, ask most top PGA or LPGA players which parts of their game they need to work on and they will be able to tell you in exacting detail, and that is all brought about by the data collection techniques used in golf today, with pro coaches and sports bettors alike needing to have a firm grasp of the numbers in order to be successful.

Data in golf has come a long way since the days of scribbling your score on a paper scorecard

The “Are Drivers Too Powerful” Debate Driven by Data and Tech

Ever since the arrival of the likes of Tom Daly and Tiger Woods, golf aficionados have been questioning whether men and women who can drive the ball onto the green of a par four hole are good or bad for the game.

But what was it that helped such players put such distance on their shots in the first place?

Partly it is down to better physical conditioning, but there are also other factors at play, such as club and ball design.

The clever people at Titleist were ultimately the folks who managed to make a golf ball so good that it was actually too good. That ball was the Pro V1.

Data science and other lab techniques allowed Titleist to create a multi-layer core ball that the numbers showed completely outperformed all other balls by a significant margin, to the point that virtually every pro on tour was using one upon its release. The stats also show that the ball increased average drive distances by 6-yards.

Allied to this is the ever-improving data collected on clubs themselves, many of which also add a few extra yards to a drive or iron shot. Add all those accumulated extra yards together and suddenly some courses are looking far too short.

This has led to the data now being used to argue the case for reduced-distance balls, which will stop players gaming courses by dodging intended hazards with booming oversized drives.

Courses are Also Not Safe from the Revolution

While the data helps golf iron out its issues with club and ball technology, it is also pointing the way for how golf will be played and enjoyed in the future.

This is particularly pertinent in the case of the golf courses and resorts themselves, which in their current forms have long been known to be too inefficient, environmentally damaging, costly, and overly slow to play.

Data analysis as well as some welcome input from pros like Tiger Woods, mean that the future of golf courses may be going shorter rather than longer, as clubs try to cash in by attracting younger members who want to pepper a pin rather than trudge for miles round an 18-hole course.

The post Ways Data Science and Analysis are Pushing Golf Forward appeared first on The Golf Paper.

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How to Solve a Problem Like Bryson: Will Driving Distance Increase End Golf as We Know It? https://www.thegolfpaper.co.uk/golf-news/3400/how-to-solve-a-problem-like-bryson-will-driving-distance-increase-end-golf-as-we-know-it/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=how-to-solve-a-problem-like-bryson-will-driving-distance-increase-end-golf-as-we-know-it https://www.thegolfpaper.co.uk/golf-news/3400/how-to-solve-a-problem-like-bryson-will-driving-distance-increase-end-golf-as-we-know-it/#respond Tue, 01 Dec 2020 15:57:56 +0000 https://www.thegolfpaper.co.uk/?p=3400 For all the weirdness that has happened in 2020, still ranking high among the list of most unexpected things that this bizarre year has offered up is Bryson DeChambeau emerging from lockdown as a 235lb monster – a considerable ‘bulking up’ from a man formerly known as The Scientist. Steak and weights aren’t going to […]

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For all the weirdness that has happened in 2020, still ranking high among the list of most unexpected things that this bizarre year has offered up is Bryson DeChambeau emerging from lockdown as a 235lb monster – a considerable ‘bulking up’ from a man formerly known as The Scientist.

Steak and weights aren’t going to turn you into an elite golfer overnight, but the feeling is that Bryson wasn’t far from being the best in the business prior to his muscular expansion, and in adding 24 yards to his game, the picture changes considerably.

Since the resumption of the PGA Tour in June, DeChambeau has played in 12 tournaments. In that time, he has won his first major at the U.S. Open, triumphed in the Rocket Mortgage Classic, recorded top-five finishes in the PGA Championship and the Charles Schwab Challenge and delivered three other top-10s.

Despite his former moniker, there wasn’t much science to the 27-year-old’s approach in his pair of wins – he simply hit bombs off the tee and then wedges in or out of the rough on approach. With the thick stuff kept short due to the lack of on-course spectators trampling it down, Bryson was hitting short wedges close to the pin with relative ease.

At Winged Foot for the U.S. Open, many thought that his bombastic approach would come unstuck. But, in the end, his logic prevailed – after all, just 39.6% of fairways were hit by players of any length, so why miss the short stuff 290 yards off the tee while trying to hold the fairway when you could drive the ball 350 yards and not be any worse off?

Length is typically an advantage at pretty much all golf courses, and especially so at Augusta National – it’s no coincidence that Bryson is the favourite in the outright winner golf betting odds for The Masters.

So is any track safe from Bryson’s bold new world?

Bryson Proofing

The R&A has joined forced with the USGA to work on its Distance Insights project, and while recent events have put a temporary halt to their research, already the programme has delivered a rather challenging early conclusion.

“We believe that golf will best thrive over the next decades and beyond if this continuing cycle of ever-increasing hitting distances and golf course lengths is brought to an end,” the report read.

The question, of course, is how do you physically stop players adding length to their game?

A number of technological aspects have been mentioned, from a ‘heavier’ tournament ball to a scaling back of driver head size, but the reality in Bryson’s game is that his increased power didn’t come from working hard on the range, it came from pumping iron in the gym.

Golf courses can’t change their nature either, and even tracks where you wouldn’t expect Bryson to thrive – think heavily doglegging layouts like Colonial Country Club – are susceptible when he is able to launch his drives and essentially cut corners.

Let’s also be fair – DeChambeau possesses fantastic touch around the greens and an increasingly reliable putting stroke, so there are no concerns of long drive champions suddenly going out and winning majors.

But huge driving beasts with a quality short game? They pose the biggest threat to the future of this unique sport that typically embraces all shapes and sizes.  

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